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Calculating the amount of Watts when creating a Permanent Magnet Generator? (Read 15091 times)
AaronWeber
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Re: Calculating the amount of Watts when creating a Permanent Magnet Generator?
Reply #4 - Aug 14th, 2012 at 9:24pm
 
Ahh...
I see what you mean.
The problem with this is that I received the motor with my house. My German engineer of a grandfather refused to throw anything away. In short, I have the motor, but the rest of the machine was trashed years ago. It is old enough (judging by the model number and westinghouse logo) that there would only be one speed, and certainly only one direction. I do see where you are coming from though, new efficient motors would have to be torn down and rebuilt.

I'm just looking for a bit of free energy for a summer cabin I'm building. Not sure about the spinning drum theory, but it has some potential.

Wind is quite steady in the high valleys. Maybe not as much as I'd like.  Wink
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electron
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Re: Calculating the amount of Watts when creating a Permanent Magnet Generator?
Reply #3 - Aug 14th, 2012 at 8:55pm
 
Some 120V AC motors have a "run capacitor" on them, which creates a 3rd phase and that would be nice because it's like a lot of the PMAs out there.

The washing machine will probably have a couple coils, like a low and high speed, possibly reverse and that is going to take up space where you could have productive materials. Might not matter if you are just looking for some power from something that is free.

In my experience the wind is never steady, unless you live in a wind tunnel Smiley

It will be interesting to see how this works out because there are a lot of washers being thrown away every day.

"Convert your old clothes washer to produce clean free energy from the wind today!"

Any way you could use the old spinning drum and bearing as a VAWT?
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AaronWeber
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Re: Calculating the amount of Watts when creating a Permanent Magnet Generator?
Reply #2 - Aug 14th, 2012 at 8:27pm
 
I don't intend to run it at full capacity. I want to be able to charge two to three 12v batteries.

"If you can pick up 3 phases from the motor that would be good."

Not quite sure what you mean here since it is a 1Phase motor.

If I knew the percentage efficiency lost by engaging the motor I could calculate the gear ratio. Essentially I only planned to use two cogs wheels, one being proportionately larger. The wind is steady, any inconsistencies would be accommodated because I'm not running the motor at full capacity.
I could be completely missing out on what you're trying to say though.
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electron
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Re: Calculating the amount of Watts when creating a Permanent Magnet Generator?
Reply #1 - Aug 14th, 2012 at 4:23pm
 
It's going to be hard to say what you will need. You should look at a lot of other turbine PMAs out there like on YouTube and company sites where they show them taken apart.

You want to put as many as you can, but spaced a little apart.

If you can pick up 3 phases from the motor that would be good.

I'm wondering what type of gearing you are going to rig up to make it a lower RPM and where will the parts come from? If you can use the washer parts then please make a video of how you did it, a lot of people would be interested in that project.

If it's going to be belt drive, some people have tried that and the power needed to drive a belt was too high and they went with a bicycle chain instead.

Sounds like a fun project.
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AaronWeber
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Calculating the amount of Watts when creating a Permanent Magnet Generator?
Aug 14th, 2012 at 1:23pm
 
I am in the process of making a permanent magnet induction generator from and old washing machine induction motor. The motor is rated 1725 rmp, 115 volts 6.3 amps at 1/3 horsepower. It is a single phase motor. I intend to use it for a wind turbine so running the rotor 5% above rated rpm's is not an option. Instead I would like to drill out the rotor and put in cylindrical Neodymium magnets 3/8" diameter by 1" length. If i want to run the engine at low RPM (say 0 to 600 for a turbine) how many magnets would I need to use to achieve an output of 500 watts or more, if that is possible.
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